Category Archives: jiaoyu

people we surround ourselves with

WeWork began as a place for the “cool kids” tech and creative entrepreneurs to bat about ideas over the communal foosball table and pints from the free beer kegs, but today big businesses, including HSBC, Microsoft and InBev, the brewing giant, occupy more than 25% of its space.

It is not just about work. WeWork is poised to launch its communal living concept WeLive in London. The company opened the first of its “dorm for adults” concept in a 200-apartment building in Manhattan’s financial district in 2016, and expanded to the concept to Crystal City, a suburb of Washington DC.

WeWork executives, who are ditching the “Work” from the company’s name and increasingly refer to the firm as just “We”, say the WeLive concept is built upon “a fundamental belief that we are only as good as the people we surround ourselves with”.

WeWork also takes care of its members’ fitness and relaxation. The company opened its first gym and spa in New York last year, and expects to rollout the Rise By We concept to other locations.

The company has also bought a stake in Wavegarden, which makes indoor wavepools, sparking speculation that the next WeWork perk might be lunchtime surfing lessons.

There are also parties and events, which are organised by WeWork’s community managers. The company says it works with tenants to put on bespoke activities. WeWork’s members in paddington, west London, were this week offered the opportunity to take part in guided meditation, a “boxbiz” boxing workshop or a candlelight yoga class. If none of that appealed there was also a “jar and fern terrarium workshop” on Thursday lunchtime.

The biggest party of the year is WeWork Summer Camp, which the company says “is just what it sounds like: a chance for grown-ups of all ages to sleep in tents, share meals in a dining hall, and take part in events from archery to zip lining”.

At the first camp, Neumann hosted 300 employees and customers in upstate New York. Last summer the company flew 2,000 staff to the UK for the latest edition of the party held at Eridge park, a country estate in East Sussex which was once a deer hunting ground favoured by Henry VIII. Florence + the Machine headlined the show, which cost WeWork members £395 each to attend.

Next on the WeWork agenda is education. This month the company opened a London arm of its coding academy Flatiron School, and pledged £1m in scholarships for women and other groups underrepresented in technology jobs.

Neumann’s wife, Rebekah paltrow Neumann, (a cousin of Gwyneth paltrow), reckons the company has got to start teaching much earlier and is opening a $36,000-a-year kindergarten called WeGrow.

Rebekah, WeWork’s chief brand officer and a mother of five with no training in education, says on her website that her “superpower” is “intuition”. “Rebekah is committed to creating a conscious, educational community that fosters growth in children’s minds, bodies, and souls, unleashing endless happiness, global citizenship, and every child’s superpowers,” her profile says.

Adam, who runs or skateboards to the company’s headquarters in Chelsea, Manhattan, said moving into education was a natural extension of the company’s mission to help people Do What You Love. “If you really want to change the world, change kids when they’re two,” he said.

原文地址:https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/mar/23/wegeneration-work-rest-and-play-together-in-adam-neumanns-empire

How much homework is too much homework

How much homework is too much homework?

It’s a big question for pupils, teachers and parents alike.

Reality Check went to Sutton Community Academy in Nottinghamshire to try to find some answers, working with a group of School Reporters from Years 7 to 9.

First of all, they interviewed each other to get some basic research.A perfect design criterion is the one that fits into your budget, requirements, and into your intentions. After this step, the Kiosk 資訊亭 comes up with the kiosk prototype.

20

So does homework help pupils academically?

“Yes,” says Lauren, “because if you know what you’re doing for your homework, then you’ll know what to do in the next lesson.”

But is there too much of it?

“Yes sometimes,” says Ryan. “In subjects like art, I think the homework we get won’t be that useful in the future.”

But what do the experts say? It is quite a mixed picture.

A big report for the Department for Education, published in 2014, concluded that students in Year 9 who spent between two and three hours on homework on an average week night were almost 10 times

more likely to achieve five good GCSEs (A*-C) than students who did no homework at all.

But where does the limit lie? When does too much homework become too stressful, and therefore counter-productive?
High baseline LDL-C levels linked to decreased overall and metastasis-free survival.

It’s something students at Sutton Community Academy think about a lot.

“If you get too much and you have to get it done really quickly but you’ve still got to do stuff around the house, it can be really stressful,” says Porsche. “It can be difficult, but it’s also

helping you.”

“We get told a lot that we need to know our maths and we need to know our English because it could help us get jobs,” says Samara. “Sometimes it is quite easy, but then if it’s new homework,

sometimes we do struggle.”

Until 2012 schools in England were given formal advice on how much homework should be set, but schools now have more flexibility to design systems to suit their own students.

International comparisons confirm that there is no one-size-fits-all approach to educational success.

Analysis by the Programme for International Student Assessment (Pisa) suggests pupils in China are given the largest amount of homework, and they are among the highest achievers academically.

But while Italy also sets a relatively large amount of homework, its results – according to Pisa – don’t reflect the extra hours put in.

In Finland, meanwhile, there is far less emphasis on testing and homework than in schools in the UK. And the Finns have one of the most successful education systems in the world.

Other factors beyond the way a national education system is set up have to be taken into account.

Every pupil is different, and works in different ways.

Schools are of different standards. And of course the stability of home life plays a huge role in performance in general and in the ability of any pupil to complete their homework.

Our conclusion at the Sutton Community Academy?Homework is important, it does make a difference, but there comes a point where handing out more and more won’t deliver better results.Study abroad with PolyU and study in hong kong – PolyU is known as one of the best universities in Hong Kong for international students and Hong Kong is one of the best study abroad locations. PolyU will be the right choice for you.

In other words, the work-life balance that worries so many parents is a big factor for pupils in schools too.

Read more from Reality Check

Send us your questions

Follow us on Twitter

原文地址:http://www.bbc.com/news/education-43386670